Three Works

Art / Yeon Jin Kim

:: Three Works ::

My prac­tice is based on tra­di­tion­al tech­niques put to new uses. 

I make ani­mat­ed films shot from minia­ture sets and scroll draw­ings, cut-paper and book works, and Jogak­bo-inspired plas­tic quilts. 

My work is equal­ly influ­enced by my ear­ly life in South Korea and my last fif­teen years in New York City. 

Grow­ing up under mil­i­tary dic­ta­tor­ship in South Korea, I was sub­ject­ed to per­va­sive gov­ern­men­tal indoc­tri­na­tion and mis­in­for­ma­tion through­out my edu­ca­tion. Under the dic­ta­tor­ship, tra­di­tion­al folk art was denounced while west­ern art was cel­e­brat­ed. In my male-dom­i­nant col­lege edu­ca­tion, any female craft such as sewing, weav­ing, and tex­tile work was reject­ed and regard­ed as “low art.” 

My years away from Korea pro­vid­ed an out­side van­tage point which allowed me a greater under­stand­ing and appre­ci­a­tion of  Kore­an aes­thet­ics and tra­di­tions. Although I was pre­sent­ed in school with West­ern aes­thet­ics as a pri­or­i­ty, I was always drawn to the beau­ty of Kore­an ceram­ics and textiles. 

As a child I was intro­duced to Jogak­bo (Kore­an tra­di­tion­al quilt­ing) by my aunt who owned a Han­bok (Kore­an tra­di­tion­al gar­ment) shop. Jogak­bo devel­oped in the sev­en­teenth cen­tu­ry as a way for low­er-class peo­ple to wrap gifts for wed­dings and oth­er cel­e­bra­to­ry events. Scrap pieces of fab­ric were stitched togeth­er, much like quilts, to cre­ate beau­ti­ful wrap­pings sig­ni­fy­ing good wish­es for the recip­i­ent. My aunt was par­tic­u­lar­ly tal­ent­ed, and her Jogak­bo were love­ly and visu­al­ly sophis­ti­cat­ed. Exam­ples were gift­ed to fam­i­ly mem­bers, and my moth­er passed hers down to me. 

The aes­thet­ic of using scraps, unim­por­tant mate­ri­als, comes from the Con­fu­sian phi­los­o­phy of  mod­est but not shab­by, beau­ti­ful but not gaudy (儉而不陋 華而不侈). My use of plas­tic bags is influ­enced by this phi­los­o­phy of beau­ty in every lit­tle object in the world. 

In updat­ing this tra­di­tion­al Kore­an art form, I am stitch­ing togeth­er pieces of com­mer­cial plas­tic bags and also drug bag­gies I find on the streets of New York City where I live. As in tra­di­tion­al Jogak­bo, the scrap ele­ments have all been used and are sewn togeth­er to cre­ate com­po­si­tions influ­enced by the lived real­i­ty of neigh­bor­hood folk. 

Jogak­bo #2 is made as an Homage to my aunt. The pat­terns and the col­or were direct­ly derived from her Jogak­bo made in 1986. 

Jogak­bo #3 was made in Korea, using only plas­tic bags (col­lect­ed by my moth­er and myself) from Seoul. Some scraps include geo­log­i­cal infor­ma­tion, hob­bies, and the spend­ing habits of collectors. 

Jogak­bo #8 was made dur­ing the Covid-19 shut­down and was also influ­enced by my aunt and oth­er ear­li­er Jogak­bo makers. 

 

Yeon Jin Kim is a visu­al artist and film­mak­er, born in South Korea and based in New York City. 

Her most recent solo exhi­bi­tion, Kong­lish, was pre­sent­ed in 2020 at Place Mak in Seoul. Oth­er recent solo shows have been held at the Soci­ety for Domes­tic Muse­ol­o­gy in New York, Albright Col­lege in Read­ing, PA, and at the Clus­ter Gallery in Brook­lyn, all in 2019. 

Her films have recent­ly been screened at the Philadel­phia Asian Film Fes­ti­val, New­Film­mak­ers New York, Blow-Up Art­house Film Fest Chica­go, and at the Glim­mer­glass Film Fes­ti­val in Coop­er­stown, NY

Her work was fea­tured in the book 50 Con­tem­po­rary Women Artists, edit­ed by Heather Zis­es and John Gosslee and pub­lished by Schif­fer Pub­lish­ing in 2018. 

She has done numer­ous res­i­den­cies and cur­rent­ly teach­es at Fair­leigh Dick­in­son Uni­ver­si­ty and Westch­ester Com­mu­ni­ty College. 

Three Works

Art / Elliott Green

 

:: Three Works ::

 



 

From the artist

 

:: Account ::

I began mak­ing paint­ings rem­i­nis­cent of land­scapes in 2012, and since then have giv­en a lot of thought to how this tra­di­tion­al dis­ci­pline could be reimag­ined and revitalized. 

I felt there was room for inno­va­tion in the mid­way between what the cam­era sees and the soft fleet­ing images the mind makes to abbre­vi­ate memories. 

My basic approach has been to divide the land­scape into flex­i­ble zones of var­i­ous­ly paint­ed abstrac­tions, and then uni­fy them to share a com­mon place. The con­nec­tions between these areas are impor­tant to me: if done well, two dis­sim­i­lar adjoin­ing ter­ri­to­ries can melt into each oth­er, or exist nat­u­ral­ly side by side, and the tran­si­tion can appear as seam­less as mov­ing from scene to scene in a dream. 

Each of these niche places with­in places can be char­ac­ter­ized, using ges­ture, vis­cos­i­ty, trans­paren­cy, and col­or, to embody thought, emo­tion, moti­va­tion, and metaphor. If these ele­ments can blend to har­mo­nize, then they can rise up togeth­er to pro­vide a more expan­sive view­point and a whiff of a glimpse of coher­ent infin­i­ty, which ide­al­ly touch­es one with a fuller feel­ing of being a part of the world and beyond. 

Using a range of paints, tools, and move­ments, as well as states of mind, I have been able to ren­der and enter imag­i­nary places, flow­ing along with impro­vi­sa­tion­al forces. I some­times make deci­sions faster than I can think. Curios­i­ty and intu­ition have pro­pelled me to find for­ma­tions and ener­gies, like the lumi­nes­cent vibra­tions that appear in Uncoil­ing Light, which I accept to be true to some aspect of nature, even if I don’t ful­ly under­stand it yet. 


Elliott Green was born in Detroit, Michi­gan, in 1960. He moved to New York City in 1981 and lived there for twen­ty-four years. In 2005 he moved to Athens, New York, a small town sit­u­at­ed between the Catskill Moun­tains and the Hud­son Riv­er, where he con­tin­ues to work and live. He has received a John Simon Guggen­heim Foun­da­tion Fel­low­ship, two Pol­lock-Kras­ner Foun­da­tion Grants, the Rome Prize, and three prizes and awards from the Acad­e­my of Arts and Let­ters, along with numer­ous res­i­den­cy grants. A book of his paint­ings, Elliott Green: At the Far Edge of the Known World, with essays by six writ­ers, was pub­lished by Piero­gi Gallery NYC in late 2019. 

Three Works

Art / Doron Langberg

 

:: Three Works ::

 

 

 

From the artist

 

:: Account ::

My work is about closeness—to my sub­jects, paint­ed sur­faces, and the view­er. I make large-scale oil paint­ings of my friends, lovers, and fam­i­ly. My process starts with mak­ing por­traits from life as source mate­r­i­al. In these small paint­ings, I work impro­vi­sa­tion­al­ly and gen­er­ate ideas about col­or and mate­ri­al­i­ty that will be the struc­ture for my larg­er works. My rela­tion­ship with my sub­jects is the dri­ving force behind my work and what guides my for­mal and image deci­sions. This famil­iar­i­ty allows me to gauge whether the paint­ing I’m work­ing on embod­ies the sub­ject I’m depict­ing: it’s a mea­sure of my empa­thy and of the painting’s poten­tial to feel like a liv­ing per­son. The height­ened col­ors and vari­ety of tex­tures and marks are my way of exter­nal­iz­ing the sub­jects’ inte­ri­or­i­ty, giv­ing the view­er a sense of their human­i­ty, and through that, my own. This is a response to the dehu­man­iza­tion of queer­ness I see embed­ded in our legal sys­tem, in the media, and in every­day life. The his­to­ry of paint­ing also reflects such atti­tudes in the work of artists like Delacroix, Courbet, Ingres, Picas­so etc.; their desire is metaphor­i­cal of the most major themes in cul­ture like war, god, life, death and more, where­as rep­re­sen­ta­tions of queer desire are not afford­ed that same grav­i­ty, seen as only able to stand for what they depict. As a way out of this bind, I look at artists and writ­ers such as Alice Neel, James Bald­win, and David Hock­ney that come from mar­gin­al­ized points of view, but who were able to tran­scend this chal­lenge and speak to larg­er truths. Inspired by Hockney’s diary-like imagery, I sit­u­ate depic­tions of queer sex­u­al­i­ty and inti­ma­cy with­in a larg­er nar­ra­tive of every­day scenes, fram­ing queer­ness as a way of view­ing and being in the world rather than just a sub­ject mat­ter. In these chro­mat­ic envi­ron­ments, fueled by per­son­al con­nec­tion and a near abstract for­mal qual­i­ty, I want to make queer plea­sure, friend­ship, and inti­ma­cy feel expan­sive, and for my figures—and me by proxy—to have the free­dom to be ful­ly themselves. 

 

 

Doron Lang­berg (b.1985, Yokneam, Israel) lives and works in New York. He received his MFA from Yale Uni­ver­si­ty and holds a BFA from UPenn and a Cer­tifi­cate from PAFA (Penn­syl­va­nia Acad­e­my of the Fine Arts). Lang­berg has attend­ed the Sharpe Walen­tas Stu­dio Pro­gram, Yad­do artist res­i­den­cy, and the Queer Art Men­tor­ship Pro­gram and is cur­rent­ly at the EFA Stu­dio Pro­gram. His work was shown at the LSU muse­um, Amer­i­can Acad­e­my of Arts and Let­ters, Leslei Lohman Muse­um, The PAFA Muse­um, Per­rotin Gallery, Yos­si Milo Gallery, DC Moore Gallery, 1969 Gallery, and sev­er­al uni­ver­si­ty art gal­leries. Langberg’s work was reviewed in Art in Amer­i­ca, Frieze Mag­a­zine, The Brook­lyn Rail, Hyper­al­ler­gic, Art­Crit­i­cal, and GAYLETTER, and it is in the col­lec­tion of the PAFA Museum.

Three Works

Art / Roberto Jamora

:: Three Works ::

 

 

From the artist

:: Account ::

Each gra­di­ent is a vignette of an expe­ri­ence or place in my Pass­ing Mem­o­ries series. I attempt to com­mit impor­tant events in my life to mem­o­ry via paint­ing. I mine col­or from mem­o­ry and pho­tos I’ve taken/have been tagged in on social media. Cold wax and oil paint are swiped across the can­vas to con­ceal extra­ne­ous pos­si­bil­i­ties and to lim­it sen­ti­men­tal­i­ty. A thin trace of land­scape is revealed. Skin tones, days at the beach, climb­ing a moun­tain with a lover, my par­ents’ back­yard, a city side­walk, the bay­ous in Louisiana where my ances­tors once lived: col­or trig­gers these recollections.

Re: Post­cards from Uncle Rena­to to Lola and Lolo

I am not a reli­gious per­son but feel most spir­i­tu­al when I paint about my fam­i­ly or the Fil­ip­inx dias­po­ra — try­ing to make a con­nec­tion with the past. While mak­ing this piece I tried to con­jure the ances­tors, specif­i­cal­ly my Lola (grand­moth­er), Lolo (grand­fa­ther), and Uncle Rena­to: he was the first of my dad’s sib­lings to immi­grate to the US. I nev­er met him or Lolo because they died sev­er­al years before I was born. In 2010, I was at an artist res­i­den­cy in Que­zon City, Philip­pines and took a trip to my dad’s ances­tral home in Sor­so­gon, Bicol. My cousin Michael found a bag of photos/postcards/letters that my Lola (my grand­moth­er who had passed away in 2005) hid in the fam­i­ly store­house next to sacks of rice. I scanned as many of the pho­tos as I could at the uni­ver­si­ty Michael taught at. I wasn’t sure what I would do with the new­found his­tor­i­cal doc­u­ments of my fam­i­ly until recent­ly, but real­ized that these pho­tos are some of my only visu­al con­nec­tions to my family’s past. The gra­di­ents in this work are from Uncle Renato’s post­cards and pho­tos of Lola and Lolo. The lay­er on top is the skin tones from aged pho­tos (hence the pink­ish violet/ochre sepia tones) of my Lola, Lolo, Uncle Rena­to, and my own skin tone.

 

Rober­to Jamo­ra (b. 1987, Annapo­lis, MD) holds a BFA from Vir­ginia Com­mon­wealth Uni­ver­si­ty and an MFA from Pur­chase Col­lege, State Uni­ver­si­ty of New York. He lives and works in Rich­mond, VA and is an Adjunct Pro­fes­sor at VCU School of the Arts. He was award­ed a 2018 Artist Com­mu­ni­ty Engage­ment Grant from the Rema Hort Mann Foun­da­tion for his project “An Inven­to­ry of Traces,” a series of abstract paint­ings inspired by sto­ries of immi­grants in NYC. He has par­tic­i­pat­ed in res­i­den­cies at Joan Mitchell Cen­ter, Rag­dale, and Sam­ba­likhaan. This sum­mer, he will be a Fel­low at Vir­ginia Cen­ter for Cre­ative Arts. His work has been in exhi­bi­tions at Frost Art Muse­um, Con­tem­po­rary Art Cen­ter New Orleans, Topaz Arts, Page Bond Gallery, ADA Gallery, Juice­Box Art Space, Norte Maar, Shock­oe Art­space, Good Enough Projects, Qual­i­ty Gallery, Scott Charmin Gallery, Foula­di Projects, Gay­lord & Dorothy Don­nel­ly Foun­da­tion, Open Space, and Out­let Fine Art.

Three Works

Art / Sawyer Rose

:: from Seeds of the Monoliths ::

 

From the artist

:: Account ::

Both sculp­tur­al and painter­ly, the forms in the Seeds of the Mono­liths series are clad in lay­ers of sil­ver sol­der and cop­per, as if their del­i­cate botan­i­cal bod­ies are grow­ing the armor they need to flour­ish in the envi­ron­ment humans are leav­ing for them. Using the tex­ture of the met­al as my pri­ma­ry mark-mak­ing medi­um, the liq­ue­fied sil­ver morphs into bark, or feath­ers, or scales. There is elo­quence and beau­ty in the act of self-protection.

The sur­faces of my sol­dered met­al spheres draw inspi­ra­tion from unex­pect­ed­ly diverse sources—typically a mash-up of Cal­i­for­nia flo­ra and Medieval weaponry—though I’ve also tapped into the organ­ic pat­terns of coral, fun­gus, and lava flows for fresh ideas.

In a recent depar­ture, I based the pat­tern­ing of the Dis­sent piece on the jabot (or, col­lar) that Jus­tice Ruth Bad­er Gins­burg wears when she announces a dis­sent­ing opin­ion on a Supreme Court case. Metaphor­i­cal­ly, the Jus­tice wears this jew­eled armor when defend­ing her views in an increas­ing­ly hos­tile polit­i­cal environment.

When build­ing these pieces, I begin by cov­er­ing the fiber­glass sculp­ture arma­ture with cop­per foil. Next, I lay down the first lay­er of tex­ture in sil­ver solder—like paint­ing with molten met­al. I add dimen­sion to the work by plac­ing beads of sol­der to cre­ate depth and con­trast. The pieces are cov­ered with a rich black pati­na and bur­nished with steel wool to bring out shin­ing high­lights on the raised peaks, while leav­ing dark in the valleys.

 

Sawyer Rose is a sculp­ture, instal­la­tion, and social prac­tice artist. Through­out her career, Rose has used her art­work to shine a spot­light on con­tem­po­rary social and eco­log­i­cal issues. Her met­al­work sculp­tures explore the ways liv­ing things adapt to chang­ing envi­ron­ments and The Car­ry­ing Stones Project address­es issues around women’s work inequity. Her work has been exhib­it­ed wide­ly across the U.S.

Rose has been a res­i­dent artist at MASS MoCA, Fort Mason Cen­ter for Arts & Cul­ture in San Fran­cis­co, Ver­mont Stu­dio Cen­ter, Rag­dale Foun­da­tion, and The Tyrone Guthrie Cen­tre in Ireland.

She has been award­ed mer­it grants from The Cre­ative Capac­i­ty Fund, The Awe­some Foun­da­tion, and Ver­mont Stu­dio Center.

Rose is the Pres­i­dent of the North­ern Cal­i­for­nia Women’s Cau­cus for Art.

Sudden as a Massacre

Art / Kate Gilmore

:: Sudden as a Massacre ::

Kate Gilmore; “Sudden as a Massacre”; PICA Time Based Art Festival; Portland, Oregon; 2011

 

From the artist

:: Account ::

Sud­den as a Mas­sacre” is a video made in 2011 for PICA Time Based Art Fes­ti­val in Port­land, Ore­gon. Orig­i­nal­ly, a ver­sion of this piece had been per­formed at Pace Gallery in 2011. In the orig­i­nal per­for­mance (“Through the Claw”), a group of women tear apart a 7,500 pound cube of wet clay and throw it at the walls, floors, ceil­ing, and occa­sion­al­ly at the audi­ence. This turned out to be one of my favorite per­for­mances, so I decid­ed to redo a ver­sion of it for the video in Oregon—the result is “Sud­den as a Mas­sacre.” “Sud­den as a Mas­sacre” had a sim­i­lar con­fig­u­ra­tion of clay and women, but the walls were a vibrant yel­low and it was per­formed for the cam­era. The video played along­side the result­ing instal­la­tion. The per­form­ers in both of these works were amazing—the New York ver­sion con­sist­ed of for­mer stu­dents or indi­vid­u­als I had worked with before. The Ore­gon piece was more com­pli­cat­ed as I am not from there, so I relied on the staff and cura­tor to orga­nize the per­form­ers. In both of these pieces the force and ener­gy of these women to destroy this his­tor­i­cal and polit­i­cal object appears as a deep and intense necessity.

 

Kate Gilmore was born in Wash­ing­ton, D.C., in 1975 and lives and works in New York, NY. Gilmore received her MFA from the School of Visu­al Arts, New York, NY (2002) and her Bach­e­lors degree from Bates Col­lege, Lewis­ton, ME (1997). She has par­tic­i­pat­ed in the 2010 Whit­ney Bien­ni­al, Whit­ney Muse­um of Amer­i­can Art, New York, NY, The Moscow Bien­ni­al, Moscow, Rus­sia (2011), PS1 Greater New York, MoMA/PS1, New York, NY (2005 and 2010), in addi­tion to solo exhi­bi­tions at The Ever­son Muse­um, Syra­cuse, NY, The Aldrich Con­tem­po­rary Art Muse­um, Ridge­field, CT (2014), MoCA Cleve­land, Cleve­land, OH (2013), Pub­lic Art Fund, Bryant Park, New York, NY (2010), Insti­tute of Con­tem­po­rary Art, Philadel­phia, PA (2008), Con­tem­po­rary Art Cen­ter, Cincin­nati, OH (2006). She has been the recip­i­ent of sev­er­al inter­na­tion­al awards and hon­ors such as the Guggen­heim Fel­low­ship (2018), Art Prize/Art Juried Award, Grand Rapids, Michi­gan (2015), Rauschen­berg Res­i­den­cy Award, Rauschen­berg Foun­da­tion, Cap­ti­va, FL (2014), Rome Prize from the Amer­i­can Acad­e­my in Rome (2007/2008), The Louis Com­fort Tiffany Foun­da­tion Award, New York, NY (2009/2010), Art Mat­ters Grant, New York, NY (2012), Low­er Man­hat­tan Cul­tur­al Coun­cil Award for Artis­tic Excel­lence, New York, NY (2010), the Franklin Fur­nace Fund for Per­for­mance, New York, NY (2006), “In the Pub­lic Realm,” Pub­lic Art Fund, New York, NY (2010), The LMCC Work­space Res­i­den­cy, New York, NY (2005), New York Foun­da­tion for The Arts Fel­low­ship, New York, NY (2012 and 2005), and the Marie Walsh Sharpe Space Res­i­den­cy, Brook­lyn, NY (2010). Her work is in the col­lec­tion of the Muse­um of Mod­ern Art, New York; Brook­lyn Muse­um, Brook­lyn, New York; Whit­ney Muse­um of Amer­i­can Art, New York, NY; Muse­um of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass­a­chu­setts; San Fran­cis­co Muse­um of Mod­ern Art, San Fran­cis­co, Cal­i­for­nia; Rose Art Muse­um, Waltham, Mass­a­chu­setts; Indi­anapo­lis Muse­um of Art, Indi­ana, Indi­anapo­lis; and Muse­um of Con­tem­po­rary Art, Chica­go, Illi­nois. Gilmore is an Asso­ciate Pro­fes­sor of Art and Design at Pur­chase Col­lege, SUNY, Pur­chase, NY.

Three Works

Art / Kenseth Armstead

:: Three Works ::

 

From the artist

:: Account ::

The Yad­do 2016 res­i­den­cy man­date was to sur­prise myself. Most of the projects and bod­ies of work under­tak­en up until that point were mono­chrome, found, mut­ed col­or most­ly, site spe­cif­ic and/or his­to­ry focused. The con­cep­tu­al rig­or of con­nect­ing to a site or his­toric body was always the key dri­ver. This body of work would be dif­fer­ent. It was strict­ly exper­i­men­tal and for FUN. This had nev­er hap­pened before. There were no rules, or for that mat­ter, goals. Each day set up new pud­dles or twists of met­al cut up in the stu­dio and then embed­ded in the paint. Each twist led away from know­ing. The Yad­do exper­i­ments are a com­plete body of work. In sev­en weeks, I com­plet­ed some one hun­dred plus works (they still have not all been count­ed) that I do not know. They know me. 

 

Kenseth Arm­stead has cre­at­ed provoca­tive mul­ti­me­dia instal­la­tion art for three decades. These works have been exhib­it­ed in sev­er­al his­toric exhi­bi­tions which include Black Male: Rep­re­sen­ta­tions of Mas­culin­i­ty in Con­tem­po­rary Art at the Whit­ney Muse­um of Amer­i­can Art & Armand Ham­mer Muse­um in 1994; the Berlin Vide­oFest in 1994; Frames of Ref­er­ence: Reflec­tions on Media at The Solomon R. Guggen­heim Muse­um in 1999; Race in Dig­i­tal Space at the MIT List Visu­al Arts Cen­ter & Stu­dio Muse­um in Harlem in 2001; Veni Vidi Video at the Stu­dio Muse­um in Harlem (their first video exhi­bi­tion) in 2003; Open House: Work­ing in Brook­lyn at the Brook­lyn Muse­um in 2004; “Edit­ed at EAI”: Video Inter­fer­ence (cel­e­brat­ing 45 years of their award win­ning col­lec­tion) at Elec­tron­ic Arts Inter­mix in 2016; and most recent­ly, the crit­i­cal­ly acclaimed Mod­ern Hero­ics: 75 years of African Amer­i­can Expres­sion­ism at the Newark Muse­um. In each case, Armstead’s work has been includ­ed in piv­otal explo­rations of Amer­i­can cul­ture, emerg­ing fields, gen­der pol­i­tics, the New York art scene, eth­nic­i­ty, artis­tic inno­va­tion, his­to­ry, and insti­tu­tion-defin­ing moments. Armstead’s videos, draw­ings, and sculp­tures are includ­ed in the col­lec­tions of the Cen­tre Pom­pi­dou, African Amer­i­can Muse­um in Dal­las, Texas, The Newark Muse­um, and numer­ous oth­er pub­lic and pri­vate collections. 

Three Works

Art / Xiaoze Xie

From the Artist

:: Account ::

I am inter­est­ed in the tem­po­rary nature of news­pa­pers as every­day objects loaded with all-encom­pass­ing infor­ma­tion of chang­ing dai­ly life: from the front-page news to stock mar­ket columns to birth announce­ments and obit­u­ar­ies. News­pa­pers are recy­cled. Life goes on. “The Silent Flow of Dai­ly Life” (1998 – ) is a series of paint­ings that depict news­pa­per stacks found on the shelves as arranged by librar­i­ans, usu­al­ly marked or labeled with dates. In these paint­ings, the abstract pat­tern on the side of a stack gives away no spe­cif­ic infor­ma­tion. In the “Frag­men­tary Views” series (2001– ), the close-up view of the news­pa­per stack reveals frag­ment­ed news pic­tures and texts of seem­ing­ly unre­lat­ed events, from the qui­et pas­sage of the every­day to the dis­turb­ing con­flicts and tragedies of our time. The acci­den­tal jux­ta­po­si­tion of images and texts sug­gests, and at the same time con­ceals, a larg­er, more com­plex social picture.

What can you say, in the face of what’s hap­pen­ing every day? Noth­ing comes as a shock, real­ly. In the news­pa­per paint­ings, I am try­ing to find a way to com­bine my ideas and inter­ests in the ear­li­er “Library Series” paint­ings of decay­ing books and instal­la­tions deal­ing with his­tor­i­cal events in a sim­ple format.

 

Xiaoze Xie is an inter­na­tion­al­ly rec­og­nized artist who has exhib­it­ed exten­sive­ly in the U.S. and abroad. His work is in the per­ma­nent col­lec­tion of the Muse­um of Fine Arts Hous­ton, Oak­land Muse­um of Cal­i­for­nia, San Jose Muse­um of Art, and Scotts­dale Muse­um of Con­tem­po­rary Art. Xie received the Painters & Sculp­tors Grant from the Joan Mitchell Foun­da­tion (2013) and the Pol­lock-Kras­ner Foun­da­tion Grant (2003). Xie is the Paul L. & Phyl­lis Wat­tis Pro­fes­sor of Art at Stan­ford University.

Three Works

Art / Susanna Heller

 

From the artist

:: Account ::

I walk every day up and down the streets of Brook­lyn and Man­hat­tan, over the bridges, along the water­fronts, and up onto the high perch­es of var­i­ous tall tow­ers, wild­ly sketching/drawing the move­ment and ges­tures of the urban land­scape from all van­tage points. (For exam­ple, one pre­cious year spent on the 91st floor of the World Trade Cen­ter, North Tow­er, in 1999 – 2000.)

My paint­ings focus on space and move­ment; I want to sug­gest a con­stant sense of motion on the can­vas, my impli­ca­tion being that ‘sta­t­ic’ or ‘com­plete’ are terms that don’t exist in our expe­ri­enced lives! The seem­ing­ly con­tra­dic­to­ry pur­suit, that is, using a very sta­t­ic and finite form as a paint­ing or draw­ing to express these ideas, is exact­ly what intrigues me. It’s the way we humans inter­pret through the sen­so­ry, emo­tion­al, and social lan­guages that I am nego­ti­at­ing. Through my appli­ca­tion of col­or and paint, I have spent decades depict­ing wind, light, and smoke, and even trav­el, time, TIME PASSING. I want to bring clar­i­ty to the ener­gy, smells, and sounds of the city; per­spec­tives are dis­tort­ed and are mul­ti­ple in each work.

Often from a bird’s eye view, I am depict­ing moods of an urban atmos­phere at the mer­cy of the nat­ur­al ele­ments, influ­enced and changed by dawn or rain, and an accom­pa­ny­ing sense of flight or heady ver­ti­go. My paint­ings encap­su­late entire cityscapes: build­ings crowd­ed togeth­er below mas­sive weath­er sys­tems, full of ener­gy and in per­pet­u­al turmoil.

Even in the most expres­sive paint­ings of sun or storm, the city is always present; it is a dis­tinct reminder of our home and heart and life under the enor­mi­ty of the skies.

A paint­ing, like a walk, con­nects the phys­i­cal expe­ri­ence: (feet on the ground/paint on the can­vas), to move­ment, ener­gy, and space. Past, present, and future are all ignit­ed with each moment of see­ing or each step tak­en. We all live in dif­fer­ent ‘nows,’ but in a paint­ing, you enter and trav­el in a mul­ti­tude of ways at the same moment, a time ele­ment that is not lin­ear but cyclical!

I love to read, inter­pret, and depict the thicks and thins of urban routes. A paint­ing can bend, stretch, and mul­ti­ply space and time in a sin­gle place. It can bring that which is invis­i­ble or uncon­scious, unno­ticed or unnamed, into the fore­front of a seem­ing­ly ordi­nary moment.

The high-pitched inten­si­ty of cities (most­ly New York), can be expressed through chaot­ic mass­es of paint that explode above and below min­i­mal sky­lines, which I like to make shift and dis­ap­pear. These are sourced from hun­dreds of draw­ings done on sight dur­ing long wan­der­ings on foot through­out the city. The paint­ings are about the city, but most­ly they are about the thick­ness of paint and the abil­i­ty of the human hand to move it.

 

Susan­na Heller was born in New York in 1956, but grew up in Mon­tre­al, Cana­da. After com­plet­ing col­lege at Nova Sco­tia Col­lege of Art and Design in Hal­i­fax, Heller returned to New York. She has lived and worked in Brook­lyn since 1981. Her awards include grants and fel­low­ships from the NEA, Guggen­heim Foun­da­tion, Joan Mitchell Foun­da­tion, Cana­da Coun­cil, and Yad­do. She is rep­re­sent­ed by the Olga Kor­p­er Gallery in Toron­to and Mag­nan­Metz gallery in New York.

Three Works

Art / Kelda Martensen

 From the artist

:: Account ::

These works aim to com­mu­ni­cate the unre­solved and to illu­mi­nate the poet­ics of home and dis­place­ment. I cre­ate and repo­si­tion forms on the sur­face to allow for phys­i­cal move­ment with­in the frame and the free asso­ci­a­tion of process, con­cept and mate­r­i­al. I see col­lage as a code, a way of think­ing and a vehi­cle for approach­ing a con­cep­tu­al des­ti­na­tion. With col­lage, mem­o­ry and cur­rent expe­ri­ence can exist on one plane. I use archi­tec­tur­al sym­bols (doors, roofs, sid­ing, hard­wood floors) in order to speak to ideas of place – specif­i­cal­ly how mem­o­ries of home and place are altered through cur­rent expe­ri­ence yet are for­ev­er asso­ci­at­ed with the archi­tec­tur­al fea­tures of the past. I don’t see the past iso­lat­ed from the present and so gath­er and cre­ate rep­re­sen­ta­tions (pho­tos, draw­ings, prints) from places I’ve lived at dif­fer­ent times in my life and cre­ate new rela­tion­ships between seem­ing­ly incom­pat­i­ble and dis­parate icons.

The reeval­u­a­tion and repo­si­tion­ing of these images is a way for the view­er to trav­el with­in the work and to expe­ri­ence mul­ti­plic­i­ty with­in the frame. My pas­sion in art mak­ing is both in the fixed, graph­ic mark of the print, and the more mobile and reac­tive tra­di­tion of draw­ing and col­lage. Through the col­laps­ing of images and expe­ri­ences, my work aims to dis­rupt the lin­ear plane and allow for the pos­si­bil­i­ty of new meaning. 

 

Kel­da Martensen main­tains a stu­dio prac­tice based in paper, book and print arts. She serves as full-time visu­al arts fac­ul­ty at North Seat­tle Com­mu­ni­ty Col­lege and received her MFA in Visu­al Art from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visu­al Art at Wash­ing­ton Uni­ver­si­ty in St. Louis. Kel­da was born in Taco­ma, Wash­ing­ton and lives and works in Seat­tle. She can be found at www.keldamartensen.com.